Ohio lawmakers and pastors have proposed a ban on abortion, starting with pregnancy

Ohio lawmakers and pastors have proposed a ban on abortion, starting with pregnancy

  • An Ohio lawmaker has proposed a bill that would prohibit abortion at the moment of conception.
  • Republican Gary Click proposed the bill – called the “Personhood Act” – on Monday.
  • On Tuesday, a man in Ohio drew national attention by admitting to raping a 10-year-old girl.

An Ohio lawmaker and Baptist priest has proposed a statewide ban on abortion that will begin at the moment of conception.

Republican Gary Click and seven co-sponsors introduced a bill called the “Personality Act” Monday, according to a draft law reviewed by Insider.

“The state of Ohio will recognize the personality of all future human beings from the moment of conception and uphold constitutional rights. This section will not define anything that endangers a mother’s life” read the law.

Landmark 1973 Following the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Rowe v. Wade’s judgment – which protected the constitutional right to abortion – an Ohio law came into force that prohibited abortion six weeks after pregnancy or after a heartbeat was detected.

Click told the State House News Bureau in Ohio on Monday that during the pregnancy, a “person is a unique person with his or her own DNA and I believe they deserve all rights to personality.”

“I want to see them go where we protect the person we respect and we value life from the moment of conception,” she told the outlet. “So I want to see that there is no abortion without the exception of any medical emergency – I definitely want to save the mother’s life.”

Click told Outlet that the bill is no exception to rape or incest. He did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

On Tuesday, a Ohio man was arrested after he confessed to raping a 10-year-old girl at least twice, Columbus police said. The girl became pregnant and was eventually forced out of state for an abortion, the Indiana doctor who helped the girl told the Indianapolis Star.

The case has attracted widespread attention from the media and politicians, including the White House.

Insiders reached out to members of Ohio’s state majority leadership to see if they would support the proposed “personality law,” but members did not immediately respond.

The state’s Republican Party also did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

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